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Watchung Hills Regional High School

Off-Canvas

2017-2018 Program of Studies

Select a topic below by clicking the name.

Arts

The Arts department is dedicated to helping students grow personally, intellectually, socially, and visually. Students are offered a variety of courses in visual arts, career arts, theater arts, music and dance. These courses provide students with an array of creative opportunities and which help them develop a personal aesthetic. Most subjects are organized by a sequential study. The curriculum for all courses in the Arts department reflect the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards in Visual and Performing Arts.

Career

The Arts Department offers sequential study in the following career arts; Wood Arts, Culinary Arts, Video Production and Child Development. In these courses students will engage in the process of career exploration and preparation.

Advanced Video Projects 3

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Video Production 1 and 2 and/or Supervisor recommendation
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Advanced Video Projects 3 is designed to teach advanced technical and artistic skills in digital filmmaking. Students will gain in-depth creative knowledge about film theory and criticism as well as the technical abilities needed to pursue further and achieve filmmaking and career goals in the filmmaking industry.
In this course, students will explore and demonstrate their advanced creative and technical skills. Each student will create multiple original narrative films from concept to final cut. Students will be able to identify transferable skills in career choices and design alternative career plans based on those skills.


TV Studio: Broadcast Journalism

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

TV Studio: Broadcast Journalism is designed to be an introduction to TV and Broadcast Journalism. The students will engage in the history and process of broadcast TV. Students will have the ability to analyze and critique TV shows and digital broadcast programs. They will apply their knowledge in different aspects of the creative process while building their skill base needed for the creation of successful shows. In this course, students will explore the creative process that goes into TV programs. They will also focus on pre-production, production and post-production skills, and positions that will give them hands-on experience and make them aware of career opportunities to possibly pursue within the industry.

Video Production 1

Grade: 09, 10, 11

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Video Production 1 is designed to be an introduction to digital filmmaking that will engage students in the process and the art of the moving image. Students will apply their knowledge in different aspects of the creative process. Also, the students will explore various elements of filmmaking as well as the history of film, film theory, and criticism. In this course, students will focus on pre-production, production and post-production processes that will make them aware of career opportunities in specified fields within the industry. They will have the necessary background to be successful at the next level with Video Production 2.

Video Production 2

Grade: 09, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Video Production 1 and/or Supervisor recommendation
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Video Production 2 is designed to advance student skills in digital filmmaking to an intermediate level. The students will be engaged and will become more knowledgeable in the creation and art of moviemaking. Also, students will hone the necessary skills that will enhance their art as they become more technically and creatively proficient. In this course, students will become more skilled in all phases of production. They will create digital narrative movies in various genres. Students will have a better understanding and hands-on experience to prepare them for a specific interest in the film industry. They will have the necessary background to be successful in the next level course, Advanced Video Projects.

Wood Arts Technology 1

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Wood Arts Technology 1 is designed to be the introductory course in the Wood Arts program geared toward the student who enjoys the hands-on creation of three-dimensional wood projects. Skills development in the course could lead to alternative career paths in the Woodworking/Construction industries. No prior experience in the area is necessary. In this course students will explore a wide range of topics in wood characteristics and identification, the use of basic hand tools, machines and power tools, and processes used in woodworking. Students will construct required hand and machine tool projects to assess skill levels. Individual needs and abilities will be identified.

Wood Arts Technology 2

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Wood Arts Technology 1
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Woods Arts Technology 2 is designed to expand on the basic knowledge and skills attained in Wood Arts 1. The focus is on the advanced machine and power tool use in the construction of more complex three-dimensional wood projects. In this course, students will focus on the construction of required projects designed to assess accurately skill levels while allowing for elective project work to encourage creativity. Additional machine tools and procedures will be introduced, including the Shaper, Miter Saw, and Surfacer. The Wood Lathe and wood turning will comprise a significant portion of the semester curriculum.

Wood Arts Technology 3

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Wood Arts 1 and 2
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Wood Arts Technology 3 is designed to appeal to the student who enjoys challenging woodworking projects and design, and who might be seriously considering a career within the industry. Emphasis is placed on "Craftsmanship" and individuality in project work. In this course, students will focus on more advanced machine tool practices and procedures and is always changing to challenge motivated students. "Legacy" projects may be constructed and donated to the school or outside organizations. Instructional videos on processes and procedures may be completed for viewing by subsequent Wood Arts classes. Unique and "one of a kind" projects are undertaken by individual students with the hope of inclusion on the "Wood Arts Wall of Fame."

Dance

The Arts Department offers dance education courses which not only develop technical expertise and artistic expression but also provide students with a broad cultural and historic perspective on the role of dance in human society.

Advanced Dance Workshop

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Dance Studio 1 and 2 and/or Supervisor Approval
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Advanced Dance Workshop is designed to reinforce the principles of dance technique, anatomical principles, dance composition, and performance. Students will focus on being integrated as performers, choreographers, critics, and historians of dance by developing aesthetic expression and personal style as artists. This course is the fourth and highest level of dance education within the curriculum. Students may repeat this course for credit as the choreographic content will change each academic year. Students in this class are expected to participate in at least one school-based dance performance.

Dance Studio 1

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Dance Studio 1 is designed to serve the student who is interested in beginning or continuing to learn about the art of dance. In this course, students will gain knowledge about dance technique, performance, and history. Students will also gain practical experience in critique methodologies, anatomical principles, and the choreographic process. In this course, students focus on the basics of Laban Movement Analysis which incorporate contributions from anatomy, kinesiology, and psychology among other fields. Students will experiment with creating their choreography.

Dance Studio 2

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Dance Studio 1 and/or Supervisor Approval
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Dance Studio 2 is designed to build upon principles of dance technique and content addressed in Dance I. As it is the second course of dance instruction within the curriculum; students will continue to develop a greater appreciation for the elements of dance composition, choreographic structure, critique, anatomy, and dance history. Students will create a theme-based solo that has form, content, and aesthetic unity as a dance work. In this course, students will explore Laban Movement Analysis as a lens through which we can study dance. More advanced choreographic forms will be studied, and students will be challenged to improve their technique.

Hip Hop Dance

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Hip Hop Dance is designed to develop and refine students’ movement skills while they experience the great traditions of Hip Hop. This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn about the history, movements, and vocabulary of Musical Theater dance; including Jazz, Tap, and Character movement. The students in this course will also learn about Hip Hop, and get the opportunity to learn break dancing, Hip Hop movements, the history of Hip Hop, and the cultural effect it has on the dance and theater world.

World Dance

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

World Dance is designed to provide a broad overview of the nature of dance for the non-dancer and experienced dancer alike. In this course, students will study the historical and cultural significance of both world and ballroom dance. This is a movement based course in which the body patterning of the dances will be learned.

Music

The Arts Department offers courses in vocal, instrumental, and general music. Each of these courses provides students with the opportunity to create, perform, listen to, and analyze music.

Advanced Chorus

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Chorus and/or Supervisor Approval
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Advanced Chorus is designed to allow students to demonstrate and understand the elements and principles that govern the creation of works of art in music. All students will understand the role, development, and influence of music throughout history and across cultures. In this course students will synthesize those skills, media, methods, and technologies appropriate to creating, performing, and/or presenting works of art in music. All students will demonstrate and apply an understanding of arts philosophies, judgment, and analysis to works of art in music.

AP Music Theory

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: A 90 or better in Music Theory and/or Supervisor Approval
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

AP Music Theory corresponds to two semesters of a typical introductory college music theory course that covers topics such as musicianship, theory, musical materials, and procedures. Musicianship skills including dictation and other listening skills, sight-singing, and keyboard harmony are considered an important part of the course. Through the course, students develop the ability to recognize, understand, and describe basic materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. Development of aural skills is a primary objective. Performance is also part of the learning process. Students understand basic concepts and terminology by listening to and performing a wide variety of music. Notational skills, speed, and fluency with basic materials are emphasized.

Chorus

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Chorus is designed to provide students with the opportunity to experience music, develop vocal techniques and understand the nature of singing four-part choral literature with an ensemble. In this course, students focus on reading music notation. Students are required to attend at least one group performance per semester.

Concert Band

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Concert Band is designed to be an instrumental ensemble open to any student who is proficient on a traditional wind or percussion instrument. The concert band course is intended for high school students grades 9-12 interested in participating in a wind band ensemble experience. In this course, students will study the historical significance of select musical compositions and develop a vocabulary for critique as well as perform in at least two concerts a year. Students will perform challenging compositions designed to help them advance musically and technically on their instrument. The study of proper performance techniques and exercises designed to improve students musical reading and technical skills will also be covered. The concert band performs at least twice each year in concerts at the school.

Orchestra (Strings)

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

The String Orchestra course is designed for all students with proficiency on violin, viola, cello, or string bass. Students will perform a wide range of string orchestra literature from the Baroque through the 20th century. In this course, students will focus on individual and ensemble performance. Instruction will emphasize proper performance techniques including proper hand and instrument positions, and bowing styles. The music selected will be used to assist students to cultivate their individual performance and music reading skills, as well as improve technically on their instrument. The historical importance of selected compositions will also be studied. The orchestra performs at least twice each year in concerts at the school.

Music Theory

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Music Theory is designed to develop skills in the elements and principles of music. In this course, students will focus on the basics of music construction and notation. No previous experience is required.

Music Appreciation

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Music Appreciation is designed to explore the history and development of western music. Major composers of the Baroque, Romantic, Classic and Modern periods are studied. In this course, students will focus on the distinguishing components of each of the major time periods in music history. Students will cover how music has been impacted by history and how music has portrayed historical events. We will also discuss opera, oratorio, musical theater, sonata, cantata, concerto, the symphony and additional musical forms and compositions. Students will learn to think critically as they write reviews of assigned performances.

Wind Ensemble H

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Audition and Teacher recommendation
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Wind Ensemble H The Wind Ensemble performs advanced Band-Style literature in the context of a chamber ensemble. Often requiring a single player on a part, there is a strong emphasis on individual performance, leadership, responsibility, the highest levels of excellence and musical growth. Participation is by audition and recommended by the instructor. Participation in Wind Ensemble is also governed by a rigid consideration for balanced instrumentation. Scheduled public performances are a requirement for this course.

Theatre/General

The Arts Department’s course of study of theatre provides students with content knowledge of theatre as an art form, with a focus on performance or a focus on production. History of all art forms can be studied in The Arts Through Time. Cinema Studies looks at the Art of Film.

Acting Workshop

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Introduction to Theatre Arts and/or Supervisor recommendation
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Acting Workshop is designed to focus on the art of acting by studying the development of acting through major periods of theatrical history and develop individual acting skills. In this course, students will focus on applying knowledge of acting technique and the creation of character to the preparation of numerous monologues throughout the semester. The course may be repeated for credit, with additional projects. This is a performance-based course.

Cinema Studies: The Art of Film

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Cinema Studies: The Art of Film is designed to study film as both an art form and a process. Students will learn about the film industry and focus their film study on classic American films from the 1930’s to the 1980’s. In this course students will analyze films regarding genre, theme, plot, and script, acting, production design, costume and makeup design, direction, cinematography and special effects, visual editing, and sound and score. Students will use contextual clues to differentiate between unique and common properties and discern the cultural implications of works of film. During the course, students will speculate on the artist’s intent and cite clues to substantiate their findings. The course includes the viewing of contemporary films which have been inspired by the classics or by those who created them.

Introduction to Theatre Arts

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Introduction to Theatre Arts is designed to provide a well-rounded introduction to the art of theatre. Students will understand the business of theatre, basic acting techniques, writing plays and performing a Greek tragedy. Final course projects will include a 30 minute Shakespeare performance where cast members play various roles in the play. In this course students will explore the four aspects of theatre arts: Theatre as an Art Form, The Designers, The Actor, and The Director and the Production Process. Students will understand how to create plays that include well-structured plots and subplots, clear thematic intent, original characters. This course is an academic study of theatre which includes hands-on projects, written work, and performance.

Theatre Production

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Theatre Production is designed to be an introductory course that covers all aspects of theatrical production except acting in three units: Theatre and the Theatre Company, The Look of the Show, and Performance/Post-Performance. In this course, students will focus on What is theatre? Who makes theatre? How is theatre created? How does a production team function? This course is a practical study of theatre production centered around course projects and work on current WHRHS theatrical productions.

Visual

The visual arts curriculum provides students with excellent content knowledge in both two- and three-dimensional design. Through discipline-based art education, students not only master the skills and techniques of a variety of media but also learn the elements and principles of art in a historic/cultural perspective and deelop the ability to critique and appreciate visual art.

Advanced Ceramics

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Ceramics 1 and 2 and/or Supervisor recommendation

Advanced Ceramics is designed to build upon the skills learned in Ceramics 1 and 2 while focussing on the elements of arts and principles of design for 3-Dimensional art forms. In this course, students will apply their skills to demonstrate their understanding of unity/variety, repetition, proportion/scale, balance, emphasis, and contrast. The goal of this course is to prepare students “Breadth Section” for the AP Studio Art 3-D portfolio. Students develop refined large- scale wheel throwing skills, complex layering glaze formulation and design techniques that result in unique 3-D forms that demonstrate advanced quality, individual artistic style, and craftsmanship.

AP Art History

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

AP Art History offers students a chance to survey works of art, ranging from architecture to photography at the college level. Each student will develop and strengthen skills in reading and interpreting art as well as promote the ability to evaluate works as an informed individual. Students will learn the context of both familiar and lesser-known works of art that have shaped civilization through diverse traditions. Members of the AP Art History course will have the opportunity to bolster writing skills in the investigation and critical analysis of works of art through the lens of a globally historic context. Students will depart AP Art History with a critical understanding not just limited to the selected 250 works of art that define the course content, but a deeper understanding and appreciation for all art, past and present.

AP Studio Art 2-D Design

Grade: 11, 12

Year Credits: 5.0
Prerequisite: Fine Arts 1, 2, 3, a portfolio review and Supervisor Approval
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

AP Studio Art 2-D Design is designed for the highly motivated student who is not afraid to follow self-initiatives to learn and see and do more. Students will produce an in-depth, original body of work that will represent a portfolio with a wide range of subjects, artistic styles, and materials. Students must excel in abstract problem solving and be proficient with art techniques. In this course, students will focus on completing the requirements for the Advanced Placement Studio Art exam. Twenty-four original pieces of artwork must be completed and uploaded to a digital application in May of each year. Twelve works that show a wide range of subject and techniques and twelve that demonstrate a concentration. The breadth section should be pieces from Art II and Art III. The concentration must show an individual detailed investigation of a theme. Students must be prepared to spend additional time outside of class to complete the requirements.

AP Studio Art 2-D Design (Photography)

Grade: 11, 12

Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Recommended completion of Photography 1 and Photography 2
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

AP Studio Art 2-D Design (Photography) AP Photo is designed for the advanced student who will employ the skills learned from Photo 1 and 2. Students will be encouraged to transition their photography from recording to commentary and meaning. The course will address the current approach of photography, which is conceptually based. The use of digital media to create imagery that step beyond the boundaries of “traditional” photography. The relevance of the digital image goes beyond reality. Decoding is no longer the only way to look at the world.

The Advanced Placement 2D Design course is designed to meet a national standard for performance in visual art. The course is to motivate students to perform at a college-level.

AP Studio Art 3-D Design

Grade: 11, 12

Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Ceramics 1, 2, Advanced Ceramics, a portfolio review and Supervisor Approval
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

AP Studio Art 3-D Design is designed to afford students the opportunity to demonstrate the “Concentration” requirement for the AP 3-D Design portfolio. Students must create a body of work that demonstrates an in-depth understanding of the uses of the elements of art and principles of design. In this course students will select a personal theme; learn to self-critique and how to offer positive critiques of others' works. Students are expected to choose a topic that can be developed in 3-D, demonstrates a genuine understanding of the elements of art and principles of design as well as execute the topic in an 8-10 inch piece of original work.

Art History

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5


Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Art History is designed to focus on the history of art. Studying the development of art through different periods of time in history will allow students to develop a better understanding of the world around them. Students will learn through text, video and the practice of art making. Learning hands-on skills through the practice of creating with different mediums and methods will give a background of knowledge and appreciation of the creative process. In this course, students will study important events in the development of human creativity and communication. From the caves of Lascaux to contemporary artists, students will be able to recognize major works of art as well as understand how artists are visual record keepers of historical events and human development.

Art Studio

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5


Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Art Studio is based on an understanding of the Elements of Art and Principles of Design and how they apply to making 2D and 3D art. Students will also bolster their knowledge of art history and develop an understanding of various cultures. In this course, students will work in a wide range of mediums. Students will understand how art fills a space, whether it be a drawing or sculpture. Students will explore the work of different artists as a better way of understanding the diversity of art making. Text and video will be used to develop further their foundation of the creative process.

Ceramics 1

Grade: 9, 10, 11

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Ceramics 1 is designed to enhance the creative process of working 2-dimensionally with clay in a variety of hand-building techniques. Students will understand that the study of ceramics history is an integral part of a well-rounded, contextual understanding of art history. In this course students will explore the origin of clay formation, it's historical, aesthetic, functional and non-functional purposes. Students will achieve a deeper appreciation of the elements of art and principles of design that govern the creation of works of art in visual art. Understanding the role, development, and influence of the arts throughout history and across cultures is essential for success in this course. Students can expect to synthesize skills, media, methods, and technologies that are appropriate to creating and presenting works of art.

Ceramics 2

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Ceramics 1 or Supervisor Approval
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Ceramics 2 is designed to provide students with the opportunity to continue to develop their hand building skills in clay and introduces the use of the potter's wheel. Throughout this course, advanced techniques for making larger and more complex forms are addressed. In this course, students will focus on the elements of art and principles of design, the historical importance of pottery across cultures, and glaze formations such as creating glazes. Students will create a body of work in clay that shows an understanding of complex hand building and wheel thrown techniques that are inspired by different cultures.

Computer Aided Graphic Design 1

Grade: 9, 10, 11

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Computer Aided Graphic Design 1 is a half year studio art elective that offers an introduction into the professions of graphic design and advertising. Students focus on the elements of art, principles of design and the creative process in task-orientated projects while becoming familiar with Adobe Photoshop and other industry standard tools and protocols. In this course, students learn and apply the creative process to several classroom projects that develop their visual communication skills, require them to analyze their work and critique classmate's work to develop visual literacy and verbal communication skills. Students become independent workers as they gain an understanding of the design process.

Computer Aided Graphic Design 2

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Computer Aided Graphic Design 1 or Supervisor Approval

Computer Aided Graphic Design 2 is designed to develop and build upon the skills, theories, practices, and knowledge learned in Computer Aided Graphic Design 1. Students will begin working with clients on real-world design projects, learning how that interaction plays a role in the design process. Students will develop an understanding of translating someone else’s ideas into a visual document while working in a studio environment. In this course, students will explore advanced layout designs, packaging, and production. Student projects are centered on client-designer relationships, pitching ideas, and mastery of industry-standard software, such as Adobe Photoshop.

Computer Aided Graphic Design 3

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Semester or Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Computer Aided Graphic Design 1 and 2 or Supervisor Approval
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Computer Aided Graphic Design 3 is designed to allow students to apply theory, software, visual literacy, and visual communication skills learned in Computer Aided Graphic Design 1 & 2 to create a variety of materials for a variety of clients. Students apply independent work habits while working on real-world, timed-task driven projects for clients in our school and community. In this course, students will design work for their portfolio to be submitted to colleges and art competitions and demonstrate how to manage projects in a design studio. Students are expected to work independently towards a realistic deadline.

Crafts

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5


Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Crafts is designed to explore craft traditions throughout time and from around the world. A craft is handmade and has a purpose or is utilitarian. It is a branch of a profession that requires some particular skilled manual work. It is usually in small scale production as the objects are made by hand and not a machine. In this course, students will explore various cultures, materials, and techniques through the creation of unique handmade crafts. Students will apply the elements of art and principles of design to complete projects including basketry, weaving, modeling and tie-dye. Crafts is a meticulous and detail oriented class, good for students who like to work with their hands and learn new techniques.

Fine Arts 1

Grade: 9, 10, 11

Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Fine Arts 1 is designed to introduce students to the study of two-dimensional art with a focus on drawing and painting which will provide a basis for further work in the fine arts. A variety of media, such as graphite, charcoal, pastel, color pencils, watercolors, and acrylic paint are is used to create work as students develop their skills and learn the elements and principles of fine art. Students also gain a historical/cultural perspective of visual art and begin to develop the appropriate language of critique. In this course, students explore the works and styles of artists past and present, practice techniques and skills in art making. Students will also produce and exhibit an original body of work, and the write and speak about art in a way that reflects the ability to analyze and interpret works done by themselves, their peers, and professional artists.

Fine Arts 2

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Fine Arts 1 or portfolio review and Supervisor Approval
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Fine Arts 2 is designed for a student who is seriously interested in Art and who wants to develop further their skills in painting and drawing. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements of art and principles of design with evidence of personal style and technical proficiency. In this course, students will focus on time management, problem-solving and artistic growth. Students will explore artists, art materials, art techniques and determine the role of art making as an individual and as a society. Focus will be on originality, creative use of art elements and high quality.

Fine Arts 3

Grade: 11, 12

Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Fine Arts 1, 2 and/or portfolio review and Supervisor Approval
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Fine Arts 3 is designed to help students expand their understandings of the Elements of Art and Principles of Design by refining learned skills and techniques and continuing to explore various cultures, all of which will be used to create the breadth section of their original portfolios. Fine Arts 3 is the third in a four-level sequence and is essential for students who plan on completing the Fine Arts sequence, and for those who plan on taking art courses in college.
In this course, students continue to explore the works and styles of artists past and present, refine advanced techniques and skills in art making. Students will also produce and exhibit an original body of work, and the write and speak about art so that they reflect the ability to analyze and interpret works done by themselves, their peers, and professional artists. Students will work in several mediums including graphite, charcoal, pastel, watercolor, acrylic paint, colored pencil, etc.

Jewelry

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Jewelry is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore and create 3-dimensional wearable art using different mediums. Throughout this course, students will develop an understanding and successfully apply the elements of art and the principles of design. In this course, students will focus on the technical skills necessary to design and create personal artistic adornment. Emphasis will be on the social and historical context in which jewelry has been made; it’s significance in today’s society; the original, creative and appropriate use of materials; and craftsmanship and developing design skills used in the creative process. Critiques will also be covered in class. Jewelry is a detail-oriented class, good for students who like to work with their hands and exploring different mediums such as sheet metal, wire, clay, paper, and more.

Photography 1

Grade: 9, 10, 11

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Photography 1 is designed to be an introductory course in the art of photography. How individuals manipulate the elements of art and principles of design results in original portfolios that reflect choice and personal stylistic nuance. Students will be exposed to the synthesis of the elements of art and principles of design in an original portfolio of two- and three-dimensional artworks that reflects personal style and a high degree of technical proficiency and expression. In this course, students will explore how photography developed into an art form; how artists create works of photographic art; and how a photographer sees or shows us the world.

Photography 2

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Photography 1 or Supervisors approval
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Photography 2 is designed to help students continue to explore the Elements of Art and Principles of Design using previously learned skills, techniques, and cultures as a springboard for the creation of original works, which will ultimately create a portfolio of original student work. Photography 2 is a second-level course in a four-level sequence. In this course, students continue to explore the works and styles of artists past and present, practice and develop several techniques and skills in art making. Students will also produce and exhibit an original body of work, and the write and speak about art in a way that reflects the ability to analyze and interpret works done by themselves, their peers, and professional artists. Students will work independently, with peers, in the studio and on their own using both digital cameras and computer editing software.

Photography 3

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Photography 1 and 2 or Supervisor Approval
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Photography 3 is designed to teach the student skills in photography that will enable them to begin a path towards the professional world of photography. Throughout the course, the students will use previously gained skills and knowledge to complete assignments that will reflect current professional standards and will analyze the works of earlier photographers and use their work as a model. In this course, students will focus on studio photography, location photography and advertising and commercial photography. Students will complete a series of studio assignments which will form the basis of a portfolio.

Sculpture/3-D Design

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Visual and Performing Arts

Sculpture/3-D Design is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore 3-dimensional art. Throughout this course, students will learn how to create many different sculptural forms through the use of various materials and techniques. Students will learn about 3-dimensional artists of the past and present and will explore the relationship between traditional and contemporary sculpture. In this course, students will apply the elements of art and principles of design to various sculptural techniques including assemblage, addition, subtraction, manipulation and kinetic art. Students will work both large and small scale. This is a class for students who like to work with their hands and think in three-dimensionally.

Business Arts

The Business Arts department is dedicated to creating students who demonstrate the creative, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills needed to engage in a professional business career. The department offers a wide range of courses in the areas of business technology, accounting, leadership, entrepreneurship and sports management. All courses offered in the Business Arts department reflect the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards in 21st Century Life and Careers.

Accounting 1

Grade: 9, 10, 11
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Algebra 1
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Accounting 1 introduces the theories and practices of keeping financial records. In this course students will learn all aspects of the accounting cycle for both a service business and a merchandising business. Topics will include analyzing and recording transactions, preparation and analysis of financial statements, Inventory management and costing, and internal control procedures.

Accounting 2 (H, A)

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Accounting 1
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

In Accounting 2 students will continue the study of financial accounting as well as introductory managerial accounting. Students will continue to work with software to model and analyze data. Topics will include Periodic and Perpetual inventory System Analysis, Notes Receivable, Fixed Assets, Current Liabilities and Payroll, Stockholders Equity Cash Flow Statement, and Financial Analysis. Honors will also cover Intro to Managerial Accounting and Cost Volume Profit Analysis.

AP Computer Science A

rade: 10, 11, 12

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Alg 2A and Computer Science 1 (or Supervisor approval)
Graduation Requirement: Elective

AP Computer Science A is a fast-paced advanced level course that focuses on the study of the fundamental principles associated with object-oriented programming using the Java language. In this course students will focus on topics including Objects, Boolean expressions, methods, looping, sorting and recursion. The objective of this course is to prepare students for the A version of the Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science examination.

Computer Science

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Algebra 1A
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Computer Science is designed for students who have little experience with programming and/or with the basic ideas incorporated in the science of computing. In this course, in addition to programming, students will focus on variables, expressions, algorithims and program design.

Digital Marketing

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Digital Marketing is designed to explore channels of non-traditional (TV, Print, Radio) advertising. It is the promotion of products or brands via one or more forms of electronic media tools such as social media, online listening and monitoring, web analytics, search engine optimization, and email marketing. Students will learn the fundamentals of marketing concepts with a heavy focus on the methods and challenges in the digital marketing arena.

Entrepreneurship

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Entrepreneurship will introduce students to the basic principles of business, including entrepreneurship and business ethics.

In this course students will focus on the major steps involved in starting a new business, including the marketing, financing, budgeting, managing, and legal aspects. Students will develop a business plan and learn what it takes to carry out the entrepreneurial process, while investigating real-life examples. Entrepreneurship is designed for students who have an interest in developing the skills, aptitudes, and knowledge necessary to be successful entrepreneurs.

Game Programming

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Algebra 1A
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Game Programming is designed for students who want to explore computer programming while developing games for the web using Adobe Flash®, the world’s most popular authoring tool for online games.

In this course students will learn some basic programming concepts as they use ActionScript®, the native scripting language of Flash to develop interactive games and publish them online to share with friends.

Introduction to Accounting

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Introduction to Accounting is designed to expose students to the basic functions within the accounting cycle from capturing transactions to reporting on financial statements. Students will study the business format of a service business organized as a sole proprietor.

Law, Leadership & Ethics

Grade: 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Law, Leadership & Ethics is designed to show students the nature of moral responsibilities of corporations, the rights and responsibilities of employees, affirmative action, discrimination, sexual harassment, the environment, and marketing. The topics students discuss include moral issues of business, protecting the environment, affirmative action, safety, and sexual harassment. Actual case studies will be highlighted.

Sports and Entertainment Management

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Sports and Entertainment Management will introduce students to the basic principles of sports and entertainment management, including the marketing of events.

In this course students will examine the major steps involved in planning, marketing, managing, financing, and promoting industry events. Students will learn how to develop a marketing plan as well as developing an understanding of how marketing is used to influence society’s buying decisions. Sports and Entertainment Management is designed for students who have an interest in developing the skills, aptitudes, and knowledge necessary for success in the area of management and marketing within the sports industry.

Stock Market Investing

Grade: 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Stock Market Investing is designed to highlight the power of investing in corporations through individual stocks and mutual funds. Students will explore various stock and fund selection methodologies, evaluate company management, track historical data, and estimate future growth rates. Students will select a portfolio of investments and manage a hypothetical portfolio.

English

The English department is dedicated to helping students learn to read critically, write analytically, speak effectively, and view diverse texts thoughtfully. The department places a priority on not only reading but also interpreting and synthesizing a variety of complex texts simultaneously. This emphasis will improve students’ abilities as they gather information, use evidence to support their claims, and learn how to evaluate multiple online and print sources when writing research papers. Students will read poetry, fiction and nonfiction; study grammar; learn vocabulary through close reading; and complete both expository and creative writing assignments . The curriculum for all courses in the English department reflects the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards.

English 1 (H, A, CP)

Grade: 9
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: English

English 1 is designed to set the foundation for all other English/Language Arts courses. During this course, students will develop their skills in close reading, annotation, literary analysis, research, grammar, and vocabulary. Students are introduced to many genres of literature including short stories, drama, poetry, epic poetry, novels, and nonfiction, and students will study both classic and contemporary works.

In this course students will explore the theme of the Hero's/Heroine's journey or the monomyth beginning with a study of Greek mythology and The Odyssey. Students will also be introduced to Shakespeare - his life, theater and work. In addition, students will learn the importance of time management and strong study skills.

English 2 (H, A, CP)

Grade: 10
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: English 1
Graduation Requirement: English

English 2 is designed to expand on the development of writing and critical analysis skills begun in the ninth grade. This Western literature course focuses on the theme of "Facing Realities" by exploring classic and contemporary texts from both America and Western Europe.

In this course students will analyze how works of a given period reflect historical and social events and conditions. Students will engage in daily, guided reading practice, group projects, analytical writing assignments, research writing, and lively class debates, focusing on identity and the individual's place in the world.

English 3 (A, CP)

Grade: 11
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: English 2

English 3 is designed to explore the development of American literature from the Puritan Age through the twenty-first century. Literary philosophies such as Regionalism, Transcendentalism, Puritanism, Romanticism, and Modernism are cornerstones of the course.

In this course students will explore the evolution of the American Dream through fiction and nonfiction pieces. Students will focus on close reading, annotation, literary analysis, research, grammar and usage skills, and critical thinking and analytical skills.

English 4 (A, CP)

Grade: 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: English 3
Graduation Requirement: English

English 4 is designed to help students continue to develop and refine the skills they have acquired throughout the high school language arts program. Students will read classic and contemporary works of world literature, including novels, short stories, poetry, and drama. In preparation for college studies, there is a particular emphasis on nonfiction.

In this course students are required to write longer essays including deep literary analyses, synthesis essays, and a lengthy research paper. In lieu of a final exam, students will develop final projects that allow them to reflect on their personal and academic journeys throughout high school.

AP English Language and Composition

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: English 2
Graduation Requirement: English

AP English Language and Composition is a highly rigorous course designed to engage students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts as well as to engage students in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes - analysis, argument, and synthesis. This course blends the study of American literature in English 3 with an intense study of nonfiction and college level writing.

In this course students will become aware of the interactions among a writer's purposes, audience expectations, and subjects. The course follows the curricular requirements of the College Board and offers students an opportunity to receive college credit through the national AP exam.

AP English Literature and Composition

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: English 2
Graduation Requirement: English

AP English Literature and Composition is a highly rigorous college-level course designed to engage students in the study of classic and contemporary works of literature, including drama, poetry, and prose.

In this course students will read complex texts, strengthen their vocabulary, and analyze how authors use specific techniques to develop themes and explore the human condition. Critical thinking, deep textual analysis, close reading and annotation, and expository and persuasive writing are emphasized throughout the year. This course follows the curricular requirements of the College Board and offers students an opportunity to receive college credit through the national AP exam.

Electives

American Humanities

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: English 1
Graduation Requirement: Elective

American Humanities is designed to provide an interdisciplinary approach to an understanding of cultural trends set against the backdrop of four significant historical eras in American history: the 1950's, 1960's, 1970's, and 1980's. Students will explore the historical events of these eras in American history as well as the literature, art, music, and popular culture of each time period.

In this course students will gain an understanding that a time period is defined not only by the politics and political figures of the moment but also by the social climate and culture. Students will gain an insight into each time period by participating in active class discussions, daily reading assignments, analytical writing assignments, creative projects, and innovative class activities.

Creative Writing 1

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Creative Writing 1 is a writing laboratory with maximum emphasis on developing writing skills and producing works for publication. This course exposes students to a variety of genres and places emphasis on literary techniques such as point of view, plot, character, theme, setting, dialogue, figurative language, imagery, style, tone, and voice. This course also provides students with the opportunity to experiment with the six strategies of good writing - energy, tension, structure, imagery, patterns, and insight.

In this course students will keep a daily journal in order to record experiences and observations that they can use to shape into material for their portfolios. In addition, each student will create portfolios consisting of a series of memoirs, short stories, and poems.

Creative Writing 2H

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: 85% or higher in Creative Writing I
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Creative Writing 2H, an advanced course, is designed to assist strong writers in deepening their craft. This course offers individual conferencing, writing workshops, and journaling as it reinforces the idea that writing is a process.

In this course students will work independently to compose memoir pieces, fiction, poetry, and plays. Students will compile a portfolio showcasing their work and will submit a piece of writing for publication. In addition, students will read and discuss recently published material in order to become exposed to current work of publishable merit.

Expository Writing

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Expository Writing is a writing workshop that emphasizes the development of students' skills in the reading and writing of informative and engaging texts. This course focuses on writing about real-world issues while drawing from a wide variety of contemporary texts.

In this course, students will read short excerpts and full-length expository and reflective texts, keep a writer's notebook, and produce for publication a portfolio of expository pieces addressing some of the most important issues of our time.

Fantasy/Science Fiction

Grades: 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Fantasy/Science Fiction is designed to allow students to explore the genre in terms of its political, social, and historical impact. This course highlights aspects of science fiction and fantasy and explores themes such as space travel, time travel, supernatural powers, psychological and biological changes to man brought about by science, and battles with alien life forms.

In this course students will use a variety of close reading strategies and writing techniques. In lieu of a final exam, students will complete a combination of research and creative writing projects.

Introduction to Philosophy

Grade: 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Introduction to Philosophy is designed to survey a range of philosophical topics and to prepare students for further studies in philosophy. Topics to be explored include the existence of God, the possibility of knowledge, the problem of induction, identity and material constitution, the nature of the mind, the nature of good, and the relationship between the individual and the state. This course will introduce students to the field of philosophy by exploring what philosophy is and how it is studied.

In this course students will examine some perennial philosophical questions and their treatments by both classical thinkers and more contemporary philosophers.

Journalism

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Journalism is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of media communication. This course teaches students to be media literate by exposing them to outside speakers, audio-visual supplements, and a variety of texts.

In this course, students will learn news writing, editing, layout, management, advertising, interviewing, and photography. Students will write and revise articles for publication in the school newspaper, The Arrowhead.

Literary Traditions in World Religions

Grade: 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective


Literary Traditions in World Religions is designed to examine the tenets and beliefs of the major world religions and apply them to classic and contemporary texts and various media.

In this course students will examine the religious allusions in settings, characters, plot, tone, point of view, and symbols found in Western and Eastern literature. Students will be able to recognize the connections of world religions to literature, movies, music, and journalism.

Literature Through Graphic Novels

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Literature Through Graphic Novels is designed for students to analyze image-based texts and the relationship they have with traditional literary themes. The graphic novel will be used to improve reading comprehension, symbol identification, and character analysis.

In this course students will use a pictorial landscape to explore aspects of tone, voice, and mood in order to identify cultural allusions within graphic and traditional texts. Students will come to understand that these graphic texts are both a symbol of popular culture and a useful tool in decoding literary and visual texts.

Multicultural Literature

Grades: 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective


Multicultural Literature is designed to provide students a forum in which to study, discuss, and interact with literature from various cultures and heritages within America.


In this course students will analyze literature and write expository essays demonstrating specific methods of literary analysis in relation to multicultural literature. Students will develop and utilize research skills to aid in the comprehension of literary content and societal impact. Students will also be required to prepare and present speeches demonstrating their study of both culture and genre.

Shakespeare

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Shakespeare is designed to offer students an in-depth study of all the major genres in which William Shakespeare worked. This course takes a chronological approach to the study of Shakespeare and concentrates on the early Elizabethan era works, including the sonnets.

In this course students will engage in close reading of the following plays: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Henry IV, Henry V, MuchAdo About Nothing, and Twelfth Night. In response to the plays read, students will complete reaction papers as well as essays analyzing Shakespeare's use of language, rhetoric, and poetry. The class will also feature opportunities for performing famous scenes and soliloquies from Shakespeare's great works.

Visual Image

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Visual Image is designed to provide an introduction to the critical study of film. Students will analyze film from historical, social, and technical perspectives as they learn the terminology of the medium. Film genres and the roles required in the production of film are explored.

In this course students will produce writing assignments including short responses and longer critical essays. Each student will also write short screenplays and a research paper. In lieu of a final exam, each student will construct a short film.

Women and Gender

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Women and Gender is designed to examine the literature of humanity's quest for equality. This course explores the roots of social justice and equality through the records of revolutionaries, rebels, and nonconformists who challenge the status quo.

In this course students will explore the roots of radical movements in the fight for equal rights for women and people of color and ideas of gender equality. In addition, students will consider how literature and art break traditional and repressive institutions of power. Through the close examination of poems, novels, essays, and plays by foundational feminists and scholars, students will investigate the genesis of social conflict and resolution affecting our lives today.

Family & Consumer

The Family and Consumer Science department is dedicated to helping students learn practical, hands on skills in the areas of food preparation and caring for young children. Students will experience activities/lessons/discussions that are essential for developing a balanced life beyond high school. Foods and Child Development are organized by a sequential study. The curriculum for all courses in the Family & Consumer Science department reflect the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards in 21st Century Life and Careers.

Child Development 1

Grade: 9, 10, 11

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Child Development 1 focuses on the theories and philosophies of education and their applications during the Early Childhood years. Emphasis is placed on the physical, social, emotional, cognitive and language development of the child from birth through preschool. Students develop skills in selecting children’s literature and incorporating this literature in a weekly reading program for preschool children.

Child Development 2

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Child Development 1
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Child Development 2 is designed to help students develop the skills necessary to design, plan and implement theme related lessons. Teaching strategies in art, social studies, mathematics, and science are explored. Goals and objectives are used in planning to reflect education purpose and curriculum.

Child Development 3

Grade 10, 11, 12

Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Child Development 1 and 2
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Child Development 3 broadens students’ knowledge and understanding of the needs of the preschool child. Students will develop and strengthen their classroom management skills. Theme-related topics are explored and extended through meaningful hands-on activities. Students will study the behavioral, learning characteristics, and needs of special needs children. ADHS, autism, and other learning and behavioral disorders will be addressed.

Upon completion of the three courses, students who have maintained a 70% average may qualify to receive three to six credits from Seton Hall University or Raritan Valley College, If you have questions, please see Mr. Bertelli for more information.

Foods 1

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Foods 1 helps students develop basic culinary skills, cook using a variety of methods, and handle food and equipment safely through group and individual activities. Units covered include quick breads, cutlery, eggs, pastry, yeast breads, and nutrition.

Foods 2

Grade 10, 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Foods 1
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Foods 2 allows students to improve their culinary skills and nutritional outlook as they prepare foods utilizing various cooking methods, such as pan frying, stewing, and roasting. Students learn how to prepare a variety of recipes indicative to different regions in America.

Foods 3

Grade: 11, 12

Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Foods 1 and 2
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Foods 3 is designed to help students explore cuisines from around the world, learn managerial skills through the planning and preparation of a wide variety of ethnic recipes, as they gain an appreciation of cultural diversity. Current nutrition issues also are investigated.

Guidance

The Guidance department is dedicated to the premise that all students are individuals with distinct abilities, interests, and needs. While students may be exposed to similar learning experiences, their perceptions, stages of development, and responses vary. They must learn to understand and appreciate their individual talents to develop goals commensurate with their abilities and interests; and to take maximum advantage of the opportunities in the classroom and community to reach these goals. The role of the counselor is to guide students in achieving their potential by providing academic, career, and personal counseling. Students will earn five (5) credits by completing the four Guidance-based requirements in 21st Century Life and Careers.

Career Exploration

Grade: 12 (Class of 2018 only)
Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

The Career Exploration requirement is met by students’ demonstrating competency in each of five areas: career awareness, educational awareness, decision-making, work attitudes, and social awareness. These competencies are developed through classroom infusion projects in many classes and through guidance programs and services. Satisfactory completion of these experiences is required to earn credit.

Learning Style Inventory

Grade: 9
Quarter Credits: 1.25
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers


Knowledge of learning styles helps determine a student’s ideal learning and productivity conditions. Understanding how they work most effectively boosts self-esteem, enhances concentration and improves their ability to take in information.


Career Interest Profiler

Grade: 10
Quarter Credits: 1.25
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers


The Career Interest Profiler is an online career interest assessment for students based on Holland’s interest codes. The results of the assessment include the student’s strongest field of interest with definitions of all the Holland interest codes. Students can view matching careers and career clusters organized by the amount of preparation each needs.


Holland Interest Codes

Holland codes are based on the idea that career satisfaction depends on compatitiblity between personality and work environment. The six personity types are:

      • Realistic
      • Investigative
      • Artistic
      • Social
      • Enterprising
      • Conventional

      Career Cluster Finder

      The Career Cluster Finder is a simple assessment that helps a student discover which career clusters may be a good match based on activities that interest him or her, personal qualities the student has and subjects the student enjoys in school. The results of the assessment include the top three clusters the student is matched with and a ranking of all clusters with a percentage match for the student.

College and Career Search

Grade: 11
Quarter Credits: 1.25
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers


When students are just beginning their college search process, it can be overwhelming and they may not know where to start. Students can get matched from over 20 search criteria that will help them find colleges that are the right fit for them. Students who are interested in other post high school plans will also be able to search for career interests.

Résumé

Grade: 12

Quarter Credits: 1.25
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Students will develop a résumé to use for college application and job placement.

Interdisciplinary

The Interdisciplinary courses recognize the connection among various academic disciplines which are taught by more than one department. This interdisciplinary approach to learning encourages students to link information from one area to another and to understand that knowledge is not subject-specific. Most Interdisciplinary courses reflect the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards in 21st Century Life and Careers.

Activities of Daily Living

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Recommendation of Director of Special Services
Graduation Requirement: Financial/Economic/Business Literacy or 21st Century Life and Careers


Activities of Daily Living provides instruction in daily living skills including travel training, consumer skills, personal hygiene, and daily home life skills such as meal preparation. May be repeated for additional credit.

In this course students will explore lifeskills through community based instruction. Students will participate in regular trips into the community to practice skills taught in class.


Career Exploration

Grade: 12
Year Credits: 10
Prerequisite: Recommendation of the Director of Special Services and Transition Coordinator
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Career Exploration is a part-time work experience program for students wishing to enter business occupations following high school. Students participate in work experiences with job coaches and cooperating employers.

In this course students will explore vocational settings in the community with oversight from the Transition Coordinator and/or a Job Coach.

Careers

Careers will provide students with the ability to achieve positive results in accessing post-secondary education, meaningful employment, independent living and participation in all aspects of community life. By enhancing student's social and emotional wellness, Careers will instill confidence and empower students to plan and prepare for their post-secondary experience. Students in this course will focus on career preparation and will determine their plan for employment, education, and training beyond high school.

Career Pathways - STEAM

In Career Pathways - STEAM students will hone 21st century learning skills, learn the responsibility of being a digital citizen and work on a variety of project-based learning topics that blend an understanding of technology and art to prepare students for creative and collaborative careers.

Peer Outreach

Grade: 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Services
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Peer Outreach affords regular education students the opportunity to work with student with disabilities. The goals of this course include leadership, self-advocacy, self-management, disability awareness, tolerance and diversity, communication, and intrapersonal and interpersonal skills. A limited number of students will have the opportunity to work with special education teachers in a support role, with prior special education departmental approval, as part of a student internship program.

Mathematics

The Mathematics department is dedicated to helping students learn to succeed in mathematical studies and analytic thinking. Students will learn how to solve academic and real-world problems and understand the relevance of mathematics to their every day lives. The offerings in this department are designed to make our students life-long learners of mathematics. All courses are organized by a sequential study beginning with Algebra 1. All courses offered in the Mathematics department reflect the Common Core Standards for Mathematics.

Algebra 1 (A, CP)

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Pre-algebra
Graduation Requirement: Mathematics

Algebra 1 is designed for freshmen students. In this course students will explore relationships among the following key themes: Relationships between Quantity and Reasoning with Equations, Linear Relationships, Expressions and Equations, Functions and Modeling, and Descriptive Statistics. Student’s studying algebra 1 will have regular opportunities to use a graphing calculator to explore higher-level concepts. All algebra 1 courses focus on reasoning to solve problems, and communication of solutions through various methods of representation.

Geometry (H, A, CP)

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Algebra 1
Graduation Requirement: Mathematics

Geometry is designed for freshmen and sophomore students. In this course the student will be encouraged and guided through the discovery of new concepts related to figures in two and three dimensions. Capabilities of abstract reasoning, spatial visualization and reasoning patterns are highlighted through this course. All geometry courses are Euclidean based, with Honors and Accelerated focusing on proof-based logic and reasoning along with the algebraic concepts of geometry.

Algebra 2 (H, A, CP)

Grade: 9, l0, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and Geometry
Graduation Requirement: Mathematics

Algebra 2 is a study of math topics beyond basic algebra and geometry. Topics include linear and quadratic equations, exponents, polynomials and their operations, factoring, rational expressions and equations, radicals and their operations, fractional exponents and their operations, rational/irrational/imaginary numbers, graphing and writing equations, solving quadratic equations, solving systems of equations, functions which includes graphing, evaluating and their operations, conic sections which includes graphing and writing their equations, logarithms and exponential functions, basic trigonometry.

Pre-Calculus with Trig (H, A, CP)

Pre-Calculus with Trig is designed for junior and senior students. In this course students will combine algebraic and geometric concepts needed to prepare students for the study of calculus. This course will strengthen student’s conceptual understanding and mathematical reasoning. All pre-calculus courses will delve into: functions and their graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequence and series, conic sections, analytic trigonometry, and applications of trigonometry. Student’s studying pre-calculus will have regular opportunities to use a graphing calculator to explore higher-level concepts.

Algebra 3 CP

Grade: 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Algebra 2
Graduation Requirement: Mathematics

Algebra 3 is designed for senior students. In this course students will focus on a deeper study of college algebra based topics including functions, logarithmic and exponential expressions, probability, financial literacy and trigonometry as they relate to real-life situations. This course will strengthen student’s conceptual understanding of mathematical reasoning and strengthen knowledge needed for future math classes.

AP Calculus: AB and BC

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus with Trigonometry
Graduation Requirement: Mathematics

AP Calculus AB and AP Calculus BC are designed for junior and senior students. Enrollment in AP calculus is predicated on student’s prior knowledge in pre-calculus with trigonometry. The AP Calculus Development Committee recommends that calculus should be taught as a college-level course. Both courses are intended to be challenging and demanding. Students in this course will have regular opportunities to use a graphing calculator to explore higher-level concepts.

In this course the philosophy of Calculus AB and Calculus BC are primarily concerned with developing the student’s’ understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. The courses emphasize a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals of functions of one variable. Calculus BC is an extension of Calculus AB rather than an enhancement; common topics require a similar depth of understanding.

Calculus A

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus with Trigonometry
Graduation Requirement: Mathematics

Calculus is designed for junior and senior students. In this course student will focus on the topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals of functions of one variable. Students in this course will have regular opportunities to use a graphing calculator to explore higher-level concepts. Applications of calculus-based concepts will be applied to the natural and social sciences and the business world. Familiarity with taught concepts is germane for student’s intending to study a wide range of topics in college.

Multivariable Calculus H

Grade: 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Calculus BC
Graduation Requirement: Mathematics


Multivariable Calculus H develops the mathematical skills and understanding associated with multivariate calculus, such as working with vectors and the geometry of space, vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector fields.

Personal Finance

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Financial/Econ/Business Lit

Personal Finance (an online course) provides an introduction to basic finance theory and decision making. Concepts include risk and return, asset and liability matching, sources of internal and external funds; a limited discussion of securities and the securities markets; and the effect of debt. The material was designed for use by students who manage, own, or would like to start a small to medium sized business however the concepts are also applicable to larger organizations.

Electives

AP Computer Science A

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Alg 2H or Alg 2A with a 75 or better and Computer Science 1 (or Supervisor approval)
Graduation Requirement: Elective


AP Computer Science A is a fast-paced advanced level course that focuses on the study of the fundamental principles associated with object-oriented programming using the Java language. In this course students will focus on topics including Objects, Boolean expressions, methods, looping, sorting and recursion. The objective of this course is to prepare students for the A version of the Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science examination.

AP Computer Science Principles

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Alg 1A with a 70 or better
Graduation Requirement: Elective

AP Computer Science Principles is an interesting mix of computer apps, programming, and internet skills. Unlike AP Computer Science A that focuses on algorithms and design, this course focuses on the use of technology. The course promotes exploration and creativity instead of the logic and algorithms of Computer Science. The AP Program designed AP Computer Science Principles with the goal of creating leaders in computer science fields and attracting and engaging those who are traditionally underrepresented with essential computing tools and multidisciplinary opportunities.

AP Statistics

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Algebra 2H with an 80 or better or Algebra 2A with a 90 or better
Graduation Requirement: Elective

The AP Statistics curriculum provides college bound students the opportunity to study statistics in an academically challenging high school environment. Students in this course will have regular opportunities to use a graphing calculator to explore higher-level concepts. The course emphasizes concept-oriented instruction, writing, group projects, computer applications and simulations. Emphasis is placed on 4 modular topics: Exploring Data, Sampling and Experimentation, Anticipating Patterns and Statistical Inference.

Probability

Grade: 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 H, 2A with a 75 or better or 2CP with an 80 or better
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Probability is designed for junior and senior students. This class is an introduction to probability theory. Students in this course will have regular opportunities to use a graphing calculator to explore higher-level concepts. In this course students will focus on topics that include: permutations, combinations, probability distributions, odds, expected value, a Markov chains. This course is slanted heavily toward a more mathematical approach to probability that goes hand in hand with concept-oriented probability.

Statistics H

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Algebra 2H, 2A with a 75 or better or 2CP with an 80 or better
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Statistics H is a rigorous course that offers college level material, but is not aligned with the AP exam. Focus will be on the study of the techniques involved in the collection, classification, and analysis of numerical facts or data.

PE/Health

The Physical Education department is dedicated to helping students learn about the connection between a strong mind and body. Students will learn that physical activity, core strength and overall fitness should remain priorities well beyond their high school requirements. This program has been designed to meet students' needs while they develop more confidence in their physical ability which will help their future growth and effective decision making not only in the areas of wellness and fitness, but also in their activities outside the academic classroom.

Health Education

The health curriculum provides students diverse opportunities to explore health-related issues which include nutrition, mental health, human sexuality,drugs and medicines and driver's education. The goal of these courses is to enable students to make informed decisions concerning their own health and that of their family, friends and other community members. Students will learn to achieve a more balanced life incorporating their academic, social, athletic and artistic talent alongside their developing emotional intelligence.

Physical Education 09

Grade: 9
Credits: 1.25
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Physical Education


Grade 9 Physical Education is designed as a comprehensive program covering Core Physical Education curriculum where students are provided physical education experiences which meet their needs and serve as a basis for future growth and effective decision-making in the area of wellness and fitness.

Students will focus on:
Wellness Education - Fitness, Nutrition, Physiology, and Kinesiology
Recreation Education - Jump Rope, Badminton, Pickleball, Adventure Education I, and Elementary School Games
Sport Education - Basketball, Football, Softball, Ultimate Frisbee, Team Handball, Soccer, and Floor Hockey

Physical Education 10-12

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credits: 1.25
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Physical Education


Grade 10, 11 and 12 Physical Education is a comprehensive program where students are provided physical education experiences which meet their needs and serve as a basis for future growth and effective decision making in the areas of wellness and fitness. The Sophomore, Junior, and Senior year students focus on an Elective Physical Education curriculum. The physical education class is an instructional period, a time for students to learn through the physical, with emphasis on skill and fitness activities. The elective curriculum choices for 10th, 11th, and 12th grade are a paired combination of any of the following activities and vary depending on the marking period. The activities are Adventure Education, Archery, Badminton, Basketball, Competitive Volleyball, Dance, Elementary Games, Flag Football, Floor Hockey, Golf, Judo, Kickboxing, Lacrosse, Pickleball, Power Walking, Recreational Games, Soccer, Softball, Strength & Fitness, Team Handball, Tennis, Ultimate Frisbee, Volleyball, Yoga and Zumba.

Freshman Health

Grade: 9
Credits: 1.25
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Health


Freshman Health is designed to provide students with opportunities to explore health-related problems to enable them to make effective decisions concerning their health and that of their family, friends, and community. The emphasis is placed on those topics of greatest immediate importance to the high school student. In this course, scientific discovery and recent progress in health sciences are examined as an approach to the solution of health problems. Students will study goal setting, diversity, harassment and internet safety, mental illness and suicide prevention, human sexuality, and alcohol and drug addiction.

Sophomore Health

Grade: 10
Credits: 1.25
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Health


Sophomore Health is a comprehensive program covering driver's safety, accident prevention and emergency care for driver safety which will help students learn and practice safe behaviors in all situations. They will learn Driver Safety, Drugs and Medicines, Communication, Decision-making and Leadership. In this course, students will focus on traffic regulations and driver safety rules that contribute towards safe, responsible driving. They will assess and respond to situations that threaten personal safety and safety of others, recognize the importance of personal responsibility for safe behavior in all arenas to prevent and reduce the severity of accidents and injury. They will also recognize the importance of laws, rules, and etiquette as related to safety.

Junior Health

Grade: 11
Credits: 1.25
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Health


Junior Health is a comprehensive program covering Wellness, Personal Health, Growth and Development, Drugs and Medicine, Sexuality, Decision making and health services. Specific topics and issues will be discussed, and students will be able to understand their values and opinions based on experience generated by the home, school, and community. In this course, students will study the basics of nutrition and fitness, the importance of stress management, and disease prevention regarding cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Students will also learn the fundamentals of CPR and AED use.

Senior Health

Grade: 12
Credits: 1.25
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Health


Senior Health is a comprehensive program covering Personal Health, Growth and Development, Drugs and Medicine, Sexuality, Decision making and health services. In this course, students will focus on “life after high school” and discuss the various decisions they will be faced with regarding college, careers, living arrangements, etc. They will also focus on developing healthy future relationships. An emphasis is placed on the many different types of relationships that individuals may be in. Pregnancy, childbirth and parenting styles are also discussed.

Science and Engineering

The Science and Engineering department is dedicated to helping students within the various disciplines embrace a 3-D approach to learning. Students will learn to formulate hypotheses, design logical experiments, and document and record results. These skills are the foundation of important cross-cutting concepts which include pattern recognition, systems and modeling, and scale, proportion and quantity. Students will learn to think deeply and meaningfully about science, engineering, and the natural world. All core courses are organized by a sequential plan which include biology, chemistry and physics. There is also a rich menu of elective courses which prepare students for a variety of fields which include architecture and environmental science. The curriculum for all courses in the Science and Engineering department reflect the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards.

Biology (H, A, CP)

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 6
Prerequisite: Strong performance in Grade 8 science and math with teacher recommendation
Graduation Requirement: Science

Biology is designed to explore the complexities of life and critical living processes at both the micro and macroscopic levels, as well as integrate the skills of a practicing scientist in doing so. Teachers utilize a multimodal approach to learning in recognition of the varied strengths and contributions each student bring to a classroom, including lab/project work, collaborative discussions, close reading of relevant and supportive texts, and a variety of differentiated and individualized student assignments.

Chemistry (H, A, CP)

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 6
Prerequisite: H, A - concurrent Algebra 2, CP - successful completion of Biology. Please refer to the following for a prerequisite grades: Grade Requirement
Graduation Requirement: Science


Chemistry is designed to explore fundamental atomic and molecular interactions. Interactions with chemicals occur every single day…in foods, medicines, and the environments we live in, in addition to the chemistry that keeps us alive. Teachers utilize a multimodal approach to learning in recognition of the varied strengths and contributions each student bring to a classroom, including lab/project work, collaborative discussions, close reading of relevant and supportive texts, and a variety of differentiated and individualized student assignments.

Physics (H, A, CP)

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 6
Prerequisite: H - Bio H, Chem H, and Algebra 2H, or Bio A, Chem A, and Algebra 2A, with a strong science teacher recommendation;
A - Chemistry A, and Algebra 2A, with a strong science teacher recommendation; CP - Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 concurrently. Please refer to the following for a prerequisite grades: Grade Requirement
Graduation Requirement: Science

Physics is designed to explore fundamental atomic and molecular interactions. Interactions with chemicals occur every single day…in foods, medicines, and the environments we live in, in addition to the chemistry that keeps us alive. Teachers utilize a multimodal approach to learning in recognition of the varied strengths and contributions each student bring to a classroom, including lab/project work, collaborative discussions, close reading of relevant and supportive texts, and the acquisition and interpretation of student data.

Project Lead the Way Engineering

Introduction to Engineering Design A

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Introduction to Engineering Design A is designed to introduce students to the basics of engineering and design. IED offers students the opportunity to refine and apply problem-solving skills using a design-based development process. Models of product solutions are created, analyzed, and communicated using industry standard modeling software programs. The goal of this program is to immerse students in the engineering sciences and to support them in developing highly transferrable skills like critical thinking, logical planning, and communication to their design teams as well as to a broader audience.

Principles of Engineering A

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Principles of Engineering A is designed to expand students’ foundations in engineering that began in Introduction of Engineering (IED)and technology by exploring various technology systems and manufacturing processes in order to help them integrate math, science, and technology to begin to solve practical problems for the benefit of humankind.

Digital Electronics A

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisites: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Digital Electronics A is designed to introduce students to the logic that underpins modern electronic devices. Students learn how basic logic gates combine to form more complex circuits capable of automating processes and driving technology. This course is one of two elective courses within PLTW's engineering pathway.

Civil Engineering and Architecture A

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: CAD Architecture
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Civil Engineering and Architecture A is designed to continue interest students' exposure to architectural design and modeling through the use of industry standard software. It builds upon and extends the conceptual and practical skills that were taught in CAD Architecture I by applying learned techniques by allowing students to design and model actual structural plans.

Electives

Aerospace Engineering A

Grade: 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Chemistry H/A, Physics H/A, Advanced Math Topics/Trig A (minimum), Pre-Calculus (recommended)
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers

Aerospace Engineering is designed to introduce students to the foundational concepts that govern the design and functioning of aircraft and space vehicles utilizing the 3-D learning foundation students received in the core sciences. Physics, math, and engineering combine to expose students to the theory and practice of aerospace engineering.

AP Biology

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 6
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in Bio H and Chem H; 95 or higher in Bio A and Chem A
Graduation Requirement: Elective

AP Biology is designed to challenge highly motivated, serious individuals in a rigorous college course that draws upon their foundations in the core sciences to explore more challenging content (both in terms of pace and presentation) within the biological sciences. The research skills of scientists will be combined with the specific course content to actively involve students in collaborative discussions in class, as well as laboratory experiences designed for the investigation and analysis of student-generated data. However, a strong caveat for those interested: The AP curriculum is demanding, and will require dedication, active engagement, and consistent preparation in order to maximize success in the course. An extended lab once per 4-day rotation is required.

AP Chemistry

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 6
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in Bio H and Chem H; 95 or higher in Bio A and Chem A. It is strongly recommended students complete a sequence of Algebra 1-Geometry-Algebra 2.
Graduation Requirement: Elective

AP Chemistry is designed to challenge highly motivated, serious individuals in a rigorous college course that draws upon their foundations in the core sciences to explore more demanding content (both in terms of pace and presentation) within the chemical sciences. Scientific research skills will be combined with the specific course content to actively involve students in collaborative discussions in class, as well as laboratory experiences designed for the investigation and analysis of student-generated data. However, a strong caveat for those interested: The AP curriculum is demanding, and will require dedication, active engagement, and consistent preparation in order to maximize success in the course. An extended lab once per 4-day rotation is required.

AP Environmental Science

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 6
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in Biology H and Chemistry H; 90 or higher in Biology A and Chemistry A
Graduation Requirement: Elective

AP Environmental Science is designed to challenge highly motivated, serious individuals in a rigorous college course that draws upon their foundations in the core sciences to explore more demanding content (both in terms of pace and presentation) within the environmental sciences. The research skills of scientists will be combined with the specific course content to actively involve students in collaborative discussions in class, as well as laboratory experiences designed for the investigation and analysis of student-generated data. However, a strong caveat for those interested: The AP curriculum is demanding, and will require dedication, active engagement, and consistent preparation in order to maximize success in the course. An extended lab once per 4-day rotation is required.

AP Physics C: Mechanical/Electricity and Magnetism

Grades: 11, 12
Year Credits: 6
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in Physics H or 95 or higher in Physics A and Calculus or taking Calculus concurrently
Graduation Requirement: Elective

AP Physics C is designed to challenge highly motivated, serious individuals in a rigorous college course that draws upon their foundations in the core sciences to explore more demanding content (both in terms of pace and presentation) within the physical sciences. Scientific research skills will be combined with the specific course content to actively involve students in collaborative discussions in class, as well as laboratory experiences designed for the investigation and analysis of student-generated data. However, a strong caveat for those interested: The AP curriculum is demanding, and will require dedication, active engagement, and consistent preparation in order to maximize success in the course. An extended lab once per 4-day rotation is required.

CAD Architecture

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: 21st Century Life and Careers


CAD Architecture is designed to introduce those students who are interested in drafting and architecture to participate in the role of a designer. AutoCAD is an industry standard program that allows one to fully design, build, and annotate plans for a variety of structures.

Astronomy

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 2.5
Corequesite: Students in grade 11 required to concurrently take Physics
Graduation Requirement: Elective


Astronomy is the science that deals with the study of planets, stars, galaxies, and the universe as a whole: the physical laws that govern celestial bodies, how they originated, and how they evolve in time. The subject spans the whole of the universe, from our home on Earth to the distant reaches of the Universe, and all of time from the present day to the earliest moments after the Big Bang. The project based style of teaching adopted for this course will require working responsibly in small groups exploring topics, creating visual models, review, analyze and present document data using Methodologies of Science.

Ecology

Grade: 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Ecology at Watchung Hills builds upon the foundation students received in their Biology and Chemistry courses to explore the interactions of living organisms and the ecosystem as a whole, concentrating on the principles that govern abundance, distribution, and diversity of species and their physical environment. While not linked to an extended lab, this course provides many opportunities to interact “hands on, and minds on” with relevant content as a function of the normal 4-day rotation.

Forensic Chemistry (H, A)

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: for A Level course--90 or higher in Chemistry CP; 80 or higher in Chemistry A; 75 or higher in Chemistry H
Prerequisite: for H Level course--80 or higher in Chemistry H; 90 or higher in Chemistry A
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Forensic Chemistry is designed to utilize a strong foundation in 3D learning within the core sciences to invite students to to explore a fascinating branch of science that rests upon the chemical foundations behind the technologies used in crime laboratories. Applications and limitations of the chemical analytical methods and how they relate to solving real criminal cases are featured. This half-year course integrates lab within the normal 4-day rotation, but without an extended lab period.

Human Biology A

Grade: 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Human Biology is designed to challenge highly motivated, serious individuals to draws upon their foundations in the core sciences to attain comprehensive physiological foundation upon which to think about the human body. Human Biology A considers the body as an interrelated group of systems, all working to maintain dynamic balance in order to stay alive. Many of the major systems of the body will be discussed (e.g. Cardiovascular, Respiratory, GI, Nervous), with connections being made both within and between systems.

Marine Biology

Grade: 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Marine Biology rests upon a solid foundation of core science and invites students to investigate life in the oceans and other marine ecosystems, as well as the interplay of that life and its physics and chemical environments. Sometimes overlooked when studying other ecosystems and habitats on Earth, the ocean is vital to the survival of not just marine species, but of human beings as well, so our impact on the oceans will be highlighted throughout the course. Lab is integrated into the normal 4-day rotation with no extended lab period.

Organic Chemistry H

Grade: 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in Chemistry H; 90 or higher in Chemistry A
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Organic Chemistry H is designed to explore students are invited to explore a very specific branch of chemistry dealing with those compounds built using a carbon backbone. Students will also harness their analytic skills to investigate types of organic reactions commonly found in a college organic chemistry course such as nucleophilic and electrophilic substitution and addition reactions. This half-year elective course does not have an extended lab built into the 4-day rotation.

Physics 2A

Grade: 12
Year Credits: 6
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in Physics A/H; 90 or higher in Physics CP; Pre-Calculus w/ Trig completed or concurrently
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Physics 2 is designed to invite students to apply their foundational knowledge of physics to further engage and analyze the fundamental laws of nature in directions not able to be covered during the core physics course. The 3-D learning model continues to combine cross-cutting concept skills, core knowledge, and the practices of science and engineering. Labs are integral to the physic 2A, curricula, and occur as a function of the normal 4-day class rotation as well as an extended lab period once per 4-day rotation.

Social Studies

The Social Studies department is committed to helping students become critical and creative thinkers who collaborate and communicate. Students will learn to become civic-minded citizens as they study history and social science with a focus on the past and present. The Social Studies department will promote the development of positive attitudes towards communication and critical thinking skills. The curriculum for all courses in the department reflect the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards.

World History (H, A, CP)

Grade: 9
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: World History

World History major units of study include the Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Colonization, the Age of Revolutions, nationalism movements, the World Wars/Cold War, and the present era of globalization. Students examine developments in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and the United States.

U.S. History 1 (H, A, CP)

Grade: 10
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: World History
Graduation Requirement: U.S. History

U.S. History 1 is designed to provide a comprehensive study of American social, political, cultural, and economic institutions and events from pre-1491 to 1900. The units of study include Native Americans before the Age of Discovery, Exploration, Colonialism, the Revolutionary War, the Constitution, Federalist/Republican policies, Jacksonian Democracy, roots of Sectional Conflict, developments in the 19th Century such as the Industrial Revolution, Civil War, Reconstruction, and the late 19th Century Western Expansion.

U.S. History 2 (AP, A, CP)

Grade: 11
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: U.S. History I
Graduation Requirement: U.S. History

U.S. History 2 is designed to analyze the diverse forces that helped to shape American history from the Gilded Age to the present.
Major units of study include the Populist/Progressive Era, the two World Wars, the Roaring Twenties, Great Depression, the Cold War and social changes of the 1950's and 1960's, Vietnam, the Watergate Era leading into the 1980's conservatism and post-Cold War era, culminating in the events of the 1990's through the 21st Century.


Electives

AP Economics

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

AP Economics is designed to be a comprehensive course covering both Macro and Micro Economics to prepare for the AP test. Topics of study include markets, prices, national income, economic performance, inflation, unemployment, economic growth and productivity, and international trade and finance. Students will be expected to use math, graphing skills, interpret trends and issues, as well as other critical thinking skills necessary to see relationships between economic concepts.

AP Human Geography

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: World History H or A
Graduation Requirement: Elective

AP Human Geography is designed to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of the Earth's surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Topics addressed include population, culture, political geography, economic development, rural and urban geography, and ecology.

AP European History

Grade: 11, 12
Credits: 5.0
Prerequisite: US History 1H or 1A
Graduation Requirement: Elective

AP European History is designed to provide a chronological study of the history of Europe, focusing on political, economic, social, and cultural aspects. Students will explore the rise of Europe through the units of study that include the Renaissance, Reformation, Wars of Religion, 17th Century Statemaking, Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, French Revolution, Industrial Revolution, Rise of Nationalism, the World Wars, Russian Revolution, Cold War, and Globalization.

AP Psychology

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: US History 1 and Biology
Graduation Requirement: Elective

AP Psychology is designed to examine the theories of human behavior and nature, looking at psychological thought, how the human brain works, societal issues, abnormal psychology, and human interpersonal relationships. Using a student-centered approach, the class engages in discussion, in-class experiments, project based learning, research, and authentic experiences in the field of psychology. Active class participation is an integral aspect of the class, and students will need to be able to construct and support arguments related to the subject matter.

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: World History and U.S. History 1
Graduation Requirement: Elective

AP U.S. Government and Politics is designed to examine the legal underpinnings of the Constitution and the framework of the federal government to prepare for the AP test. Topics of focus include the three branches of government, ideology, participation, campaigns and elections, political parties, interest groups, civil liberties and rights, bureaucracy, and media and politics. Current public policy paradigms are studied through issues and case studies.

Constitutional Law H

Grade: 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None, Government and Politics is recommended
Graduation Requirement; Elective

Constitutional Law H is designed to provide students who have an interest in the law with an understanding of the court system and the workings of the Supreme Court and its decisions. Students study landmark cases and briefs, analyzing and discussing how the court system has helped define and interpret the U.S. Constitution. . During the second part of the course, students engage in a mock court based on an issue currently being considered by the Supreme Court.

Current Issues in American History

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirements: Elective

Current Issues in American History is designed to encourage students who have a genuine interest in the most important public issues of their own time to investigate, to explain, and to debate the historical roots of these issues and determine their significance for modern times. The students will be studying current events and history at the same time, each one strengthening the other. They will be required to read newspapers daily and to watch televised news programs with a critical eye.

Economics

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Economics is designed to provide students with a foundation of basic economic concepts for them to understand economic ideas and principles both for every day life and for examining major economic systems in the world. Students are introduced to concepts of supply and demand, prices and competition, and money and banking. Students will apply knowledge to their own lives, including employment issues and the market economy.

Facing History and Ourselves

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Facing History and Ourselves is designed to address issues of tolerance, character education, emotional intelligences, discrimination, bullying, stereotyping, and multiculturalism in society, emphasizing the concept of being an upstander. Using the Facing History and Ourselves program, along with other supplemental resources, students discuss celebrating diversity, countering biases, and teaching respect for others by promoting awareness of the active role every individual can have in acceptance of others.

Holocaust and Genocide Studies

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Semester credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Holocaust & Genocide is designed to expose students to recent historical and modern issues concerning crimes against humanity. The class is divided into two parts: the first part focuses on the Jewish Holocaust in World War II, in which the class discusses the history of anti-Semitism, the Nazi rise to power, the events of World War II, those who put their lives on the line to help protect Jews from the Nazis and the aftermath of the Holocaust. The second part of the course will focus in-depth studies of other genocides, such as the Armenian Genocide, Rwanda, Japanese war crimes, Cambodia killing fields, the Ukrainian Genocide, Darfur, and Bosnia.

Holocaust and Genocide Studies H

Grade: 11, 12
Semester credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: none
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Holocaust and Genocide H is divided into two parts: the first part focuses on the Jewish Holocaust in World War II, in which the class discusses the history of anti-Semitism, the Nazi rise to power, the events of World War II, those who put their lives on the line to help protect Jews from the Nazis. The second part of the course will focus in-depth studies of other genocides, such as the Armenian Genocide, Rwanda, Japanese war crimes, Cambodia killing fields, the Ukrainian Genocide, Darfur, and Bosnia. Students are offered the possibility of acquiring college credits accepted by most U.S. colleges. There will be a visit to the Holocaust Museum in Washington DC.

Human Behavior

Grade: 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Students currently enrolled in or previously completed AP Psychology are not eligible to take Human Behavior.
Graduation Requirement: Elective


Human Behavior examines theories of human behavior and nature, looking at psychological thought, societal issues, and human interpersonal relationships. Starting with biological background of the brain, students learn about ideas of memory, sensory learning, emotional and intellectual development, personality, and abnormal psychology, among other ideas. Using a student-centered approach, the class engages in discussion, in-class experiments, project based learning, and authentic experiences in the field of psychology.

Native American History

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Native Americans History is designed to examine the role of Native Americans in United States history with a focus from the 19th century to the present. Students will examine topics such as Indian Removal, the struggle of the Black Hills, Indian education, and the role of the Navajo Code Talkers in World War II. Modern day issues related to Native American identities, reservation life, and mascot controversies will be discussed.

Sociology

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Sociology is designed to study group behavior by examining society's influence on individuals and individuals influence on society. . Topics to explore include change and continuity of society's values over time, counter-cultural groups, issues of identity, race, gender, and age.

Twentieth Century Dictators

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits 2.5
Prerequisite: World History
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Twentieth Century Dictators is designed to examine the role of dictators in the last half of the 20th century and continuing into the 21st century.
From the second half of the 20th century forward, the reigns of Hitler, Stalin, and Mussolini in Europe as well as the study of dictators from Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East - including Idi Amin, Fidel Castro and Saddam Hussein - will allow students to focus on the cultures of specific regions, how and why individuals gained power, and the support and opposition each faced.

Twentieth Century in Historic Film

Grades: 10, 11, 12
Semester Credits: 2.5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: Elective

Twentieth Century in Historic Film requires students to demonstrate their understanding and to reflect on the historical meaning of the films that are screened. Films selected for this course speak to the decades of the 20th century as they interpret and show perspectives of events that were at the center of societal issues at the time. Examples include Birth of a Nation, Manchurian Candidate, and The Wizard of Oz.

World Language

The World Language department is dedicated to helping students engage in meaningful conversation and understand/interpret spoken and written language. Students will gain a perspective of other cultures as they engage in written translation exercises and oral presentations. The offerings in World Language include Spanish, French, German, Italian, and Mandarin. Students will learn to be engaged and open-minded world citizens. All courses offered in the World Language department adhere to the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards.

English as a Second Language

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

English as a Second Language is designed to meet the needs of non-native speakers of English in our community. The curriculum and texts vary according to the needs of the population served in any given year. Students will understand and communicate in English and will be able to use English to identify the main idea, infer meaning and provide supporting details in both written and oral formats.

French

French 1

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

French 1 is designed to expose students to the three modes of communication; interpretive, interpersonal and presentational. French 1 students will understand and communicate at the sentence level and will be able to use sentences to identify the main idea, infer meaning and provide supporting details in both written and oral formats. Students will engage in short conversations about personal experiences, learn appropriate gestures, intonation and common idiomatic expressions and utilize digital tools to deepen their understanding of targeted themes. In addition, students will use the target language to describe people, places, objects, and daily activities as well as use language creatively to respond in writing to a variety of oral or visual prompts.

French 2 (A, CP)

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: French 1 or equivalent
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

French 2 is designed to further develop student understanding of basic French. French 2 students will be able to initiate, maintain and end a conversation; understand the gist of conversations dealing with everyday life; and express their needs, provide reasons, give opinions and make requests and explain preferences. Students will engage in giving and following a series of oral and written directions, commands and requests for participating in classroom and cultural activities. In addition, students will be able to compare and contrast linguistic elements in both French and English, and present student-created short plays, skits, poems, songs, stories and reports in the target language.

French 3 (H, A, CP)

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: French 2
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

French 3 is designed to provide students with the tools necessary to independently compare and contrast information contained in culturally authentic materials; ask and respond to factual and interpretive questions on personal, school-related and familiar topics and situations; and synthesize information related to cultural products and practices. French 3 students will deepen their understanding of French culture by exploring leisure activities and pastimes and by discussing trends and issues that influence popular culture such as fashion, style, music and art. Students will be able to synthesize information about cultural products, practices and perspectives in both written and oral formats.

French Language 4 (H, A)

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: French 3
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

French Language 4 is designed to provide students with the ability to communicate at an advanced level where they will be able to analyze and synthesize written and oral text, identify cultural perspectives, and infer meaning of unfamiliar words in context as well as interpret an author's intent. French 4 students will be able to narrate/describe and compare/contrast a wide-range of topics, offer and support opinions as well as offer advice and handle a situation with a complication. Students will be exposed to the roles of race, ethnicity and gender that define the current sociopolitical landscape through discussions in history, social sciences and the humanities.

French Language 4 (H, A)

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: French 3
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

French Language 4 is designed to provide students with the ability to communicate at an advanced level where they will be able to analyze and synthesize written and oral text, identify cultural perspectives, and infer meaning of unfamiliar words in context as well as interpret an author's intent. French 4 students will be able to narrate/describe and compare/contrast a wide-range of topics, offer and support opinions as well as offer advice and handle a situation with a complication. Students will be exposed to the roles of race, ethnicity and gender that define the current sociopolitical landscape through discussions in history, social sciences and the humanities.

French 5A

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: French 4
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

French 5 is designed to expose students to culturally authentic materials that include such topics as immigration, globalization, technology, wellness practices, literature and art. French 5 students will improve upon their linguistic skills through exposure to French newspapers, magazines, blogs, videos and websites. Students will learn to use their language skills creatively to respond in both written and oral formats on a variety of familiar topics as well as analyze and critique information contained in these resources.

AP French Language and Culture

Grade: 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: French 4H
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

AP French Language and Culture is designed to prepare students for the AP French Language Exam. Extensive work in interpersonal and presentational writing and speaking activities will help students better understand advanced grammar and syntactical structures in French. AP French students will be able to support a viewpoint by referencing culturally authentic materials in both written and oral formats. Reading comprehension and vocabulary building activities are emphasized throughout the course on various topics. Students will demonstrate cross-cultural awareness and be able to document their language proficiency in essay writing and speaking activities.

German

German 3H

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: German 2A
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

German 3 is designed to provide students with the tools necessary to independently compare and contrast information contained in culturally authentic materials; ask and respond to factual and interpretive questions on personal, school-related and familiar topics and situations; and synthesize information related to cultural products and practices.

In this course students will deepen their understanding of German culture by exploring leisure activities and pastimes and by discussing trends and issues that influence popular culture such as fashion, style, music and art. Students will be able to synthesize information about cultural products, practices and perspectives in both written and oral formats.

German 4H

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: German 3H
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

German 4 is designed to provide students with the tools necessary to independently compare and contrast information contained in culturally authentic materials; ask and respond to factual and interpretive questions on personal, school-related and familiar topics and situations; and synthesize information related to cultural products and practices.

In this course students will deepen their understanding of German culture by exploring leisure activities and pastimes and by discussing trends and issues that influence popular culture such as fashion, style, music and art. Students will be able to synthesize information about cultural products, practices and perspectives in both written and oral formats.

Italian

Italian 1

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

Italian 1 is designed to expose students to the three modes of communication; interpretive, interpersonal and presentational. Italian 1 students will understand and communicate at the sentence level and will be able to use sentences to identify the main idea, infer meaning and provide supporting details in both written and oral formats. Students will engage in short conversations about personal experiences, learn appropriate gestures, intonation and common idiomatic expressions and utilize digital tools to deepen their understanding of targeted themes. In addition, students will use the target language to describe people, places, objects, and daily activities as well as use language creatively to respond in writing to a variety of oral or visual prompts.

Italian 2A

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Italian 1
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

Italian 2A is designed to further develop student understanding of basic Italian. Italian 2 students will be able to initiate, maintain and end a conversation; understand the gist of conversations dealing with everyday life; and express their needs, provide reasons, give opinions and make requests and explain preferences. Students will engage in giving and following a series of oral and written directions, commands and requests for participating in classroom and cultural activities. In addition, students will be able to compare and contrast linguistic elements in both Italian and English, and present student-created short plays, skits, poems, songs, stories and reports in the target language.

Italian 3H

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Italian 2A
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

Italian 3H is designed to provide students with the tools necessary to independently compare and contrast information contained in culturally authentic materials; ask and respond to factual and interpretive questions on personal, school-related and familiar topics and situations; and synthesize information related to cultural products and practices. Students will deepen their understanding of Italian culture by exploring leisure activities and pastimes and by discussing trends and issues that influence popular culture such as fashion, style, music and art. Students will be able to synthesize information about cultural products, practices and perspectives in both written and oral formats.

Italian 4H

Grade Level: 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Italian 3H
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

Italian 4H is designed to provide students with the ability to communicate at an advanced level where they will be able to analyze and synthesize written and oral text, identify cultural perspectives, and infer meaning of unfamiliar words in context as well as interpret an author's intent. Students will be able to narrate/describe and compare/contrast a wide-range of topics, offer and support opinions as well as offer advice and handle a situation with a complication. Students will be exposed to the roles of race, ethnicity and gender that define the current sociopolitical landscape through discussions in history, social sciences and the humanities.

AP Italian Language and Culture

Grade: 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Italian 4H or equivalent
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

AP Italian Language and Culture is designed to prepare students for the AP Italian Language and Culture Exam. Extensive work in interpersonal and presentational writing and speaking activities will help students better understand advanced grammar and syntactical structures in Italian. Students will be able to support a viewpoint by referencing culturally authentic materials in both written and oral formats. Reading comprehension and vocabulary building activities are emphasized throughout the course on various topics. Students will demonstrate cross-cultural awareness and be able to document their language proficiency in essay writing and speaking activities.

Mandarin Chinese

Chinese 1

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

Chinese 1 is designed to expose students to the three modes of communication; interpretive, interpersonal and presentational. Chinese 1 students will understand and communicate at the sentence level and will be able to use sentences to identify the main idea, infer meaning and provide supporting details in both written and oral formats. Students will engage in short conversations about personal experiences, learn appropriate gestures, intonation and common idiomatic expressions and utilize digital tools to deepen their understanding of targeted themes. In addition, students will use the target language to describe people, places, objects, and daily activities as well as use language creatively to respond in writing to a variety of oral or visual prompts.

Chinese 2A

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Chinese 1
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

Chinese 2A is designed to further develop student understanding of basic Chinese. Chinese 2H students will be able to initiate, maintain and end a conversation; understand the gist of conversations dealing with everyday life; and express their needs, provide reasons, give opinions and make requests and explain preferences. Students will engage in giving and following a series of oral and written directions, commands and requests for participating in classroom and cultural activities. In addition, students will be able to compare and contrast linguistic elements in both Chinese and English, and present student-created short plays, skits, poems, songs, stories and reports in the target language.

Chinese 3H

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Chinese 2A
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

Chinese 3H is designed to provide students with the tools necessary to independently compare and contrast information contained in culturally authentic materials; ask and respond to factual and interpretive questions on personal, school-related and familiar topics and situations; and synthesize information related to cultural products and practices. Students will deepen their understanding of Chinese culture by exploring leisure activities and pastimes and by discussing trends and issues that influence popular culture such as fashion, style, music and art. Students will be able to synthesize information about cultural products, practices and perspectives in both written and oral formats.

Chinese 4H

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Chinese 3H
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

Chinese 4H is designed to provide students with the ability to communicate at an advanced level where they will be able to analyze and synthesize written and oral text, identify cultural perspectives, and infer meaning of unfamiliar words in context as well as interpret an author's intent. Students will be able to narrate/describe and compare/contrast a wide-range of topics, offer and support opinions as well as offer advice and handle a situation with a complication. Students will be exposed to the roles of race, ethnicity and gender that define the current sociopolitical landscape through discussions in history, social sciences and the humanities.

AP Chinese Language and Culture

Grade: 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Chinese 4H
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

AP Chinese Language and Culture is designed to prepare students for the AP Chinese Language and Culture Exam. Extensive work in interpersonal and presentational writing and speaking activities will help students better understand advanced grammar and syntactical structures. Students will be able to support a viewpoint by referencing culturally authentic materials in both written and oral formats. Reading comprehension and vocabulary building activities are emphasized throughout the course on various topics. Students will demonstrate cross-cultural awareness and be able to document their language proficiency in essay writing and speaking activities.

Spanish

Spanish 1

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: None
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

Spanish 1 is designed to expose students to the three modes of communication; interpretive, interpersonal and presentational. Spanish 1 students will understand and communicate at the sentence level and will be able to use sentences to identify the main idea, infer meaning and provide supporting details in both written and oral formats. Students will engage in short conversations about personal experiences, learn appropriate gestures, intonation and common idiomatic expressions and utilize digital tools to deepen their understanding of targeted themes. In addition, students will use the target language to describe people, places, objects, and daily activities as well as use language creatively to respond in writing to a variety of oral or visual prompts.

Spanish 2 (A, CP)

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Spanish 1
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

Spanish 2 is designed to further develop student understanding of basic Spanish. Spanish 2 students will be able to initiate, maintain and end a conversation; understand the gist of conversations dealing with everyday life; and express their needs, provide reasons, give opinions and make requests and explain preferences. Students will engage in giving and following a series of oral and written directions, commands and requests for participating in classroom and cultural activities. In addition, students will be able to compare and contrast linguistic elements in both Spanish and English, and present student-created short plays, skits, poems, songs, stories and reports in the target language.

Spanish 3 (H, A, CP)

Grade: 10, 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Spanish 2
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

Spanish 3 is designed to provide students with the tools necessary to independently compare and contrast information contained in culturally authentic materials; ask and respond to factual and interpretive questions on personal, school-related and familiar topics and situations; and synthesize information related to cultural products and practices. Students will deepen their understanding of Spanish culture by exploring leisure activities and pastimes and by discussing trends and issues that influence popular culture such as fashion, style, music and art. Students will be able to synthesize information about cultural products, practices and perspectives in both written and oral formats.

Spanish Language 4 (H, A)

Grade: 11, 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Spanish 3
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

Spanish Language 4 is designed to provide students with the ability to communicate at an advanced level where they will be able to analyze and synthesize written and oral text, identify cultural perspectives, and infer meaning of unfamiliar words in context as well as interpret an author's intent. Students will be able to narrate/describe and compare/contrast a wide-range of topics, offer and support opinions as well as offer advice and handle a situation with a complication. Students will be exposed to the roles of race, ethnicity and gender that define the current sociopolitical landscape through discussions in history, social sciences and the humanities.

Spanish 5 (A)

Grade: 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Spanish 4
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

Spanish 5 is designed to expose students to culturally authentic materials that include such topics as immigration, globalization, technology, wellness practices, literature and art as resources for improving interpretive, interpersonal and presentational skills in Spanish. Students will improve upon their linguistic skills through exposure to authentic newspapers, magazines, blogs, videos and websites in Spanish. Students will learn to use their language skills creatively to respond in both written and oral formats on a variety of familiar topics as well as analyze and critique information contained in these resources.

AP Spanish Language and Culture

Grade: 12
Year Credits: 5
Prerequisite: Spanish 4H
Graduation Requirement: World Languages

AP Spanish Language and Culture is designed to prepare students for the AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam. Extensive work in interpersonal and presentational writing and speaking activities will help students better understand advanced grammar and syntactical structures in Spanish. Students will be able to support a viewpoint by referencing culturally authentic materials in both written and oral formats. Reading comprehension and vocabulary building activities are emphasized throughout the course on various topics. Students will demonstrate cross-cultural awareness and be able to document their language proficiency in essay writing and speaking activities.

General Information

Advanced Placement

Watchung Hills Regional High School offers to all interested students the opportunity to take Advanced Placement courses. Many colleges award students advanced credit for a score of three or higher on AP tests. Information is available through the AP Coordinator, department supervisors or guidance counselors.

Athletic Eligibility

To be eligible for athletic competition during the first semester (September 1 to January 31) of the 10th grade or higher, or the second year of attendance in the secondary school or beyond, a pupil must have passed 25% of the credits (30) required by the State of New Jersey for graduation (120), during the immediately preceding academic year.

To be eligible for athletic competition during the second semester (Feb. 1 to June 30) of the 9th grade or higher, a pupil must have passed the equivalent of 12 1/2% of the credits (15) required by New Jersey for graduation (120) at the close of the preceding semester (Jan. 31). Full-year courses shall be equated as one-half of the total credits to be gained for the full year to determine credits passed during the immediately preceding semester.

Course Levels

Many classes in English, mathematics, science, history/social studies, and world language are offered at various levels. Students are recommended for the appropriate course level by teachers and administrators. Among the criteria considered are ability to meet all prerequisites, demonstrated willingness and ability to handle the work at the designated course level, previous course grades, standardized test scores, work/study habits, and student motivation.All course levels are college preparatory.

AP -- Advanced Placement – These courses are the most academically demanding levels possible. Successful completion may lead to college credit. Enrollment in these classes is very selective.

H – Honors – These courses require a high level of academic maturity, interest, ability, reading, intellectual curiosity and the ability to study and work independently. The pace is rigorous.

A – Accelerated – Rigorous college preparatory courses which have a higher academic demand and requirements.

CP – College Prep - Courses with rigorous academic curriculum for college preparation.

No Letter – Ungrouped/not leveled courses

Honor Roll

Honor Roll: A grade of 80 or higher in all courses and a P or higher in non-numerical graded courses are required.

Principal’s Honor Roll: A grade of 90 or higher in all courses and a P or higher in non-numerical graded courses are required.

Minimum Course Requirements

In the current schedule, students must enroll in a program of 37 or more credits each year and graduate with a minimum of 131 credits. Year-long courses earn five or more credits; semester courses earn 2.5 credits; physical education and health earn five credits. Each semester, students must be enrolled in a minimum of seven courses (including physical education or health) and can take a maximum of eight courses. Only courses taken at Watchung Hills Regional High School between September and June will be included in GPA calculations.

Students are permitted to take only one study hall each semester. A study hall granted for opt-out of physical education or senior early leave counts as a study hall for the purposes of this limit.

Option II

Option Two (N.J.A.C. 6A:8-5.1(a)ii of the high school graduation requirements allows local school districts to design and or approve educational experiences that serve as an alternative to traditional instruction and provide meaningful learning experiences that support student achievement of the NJCCCS and State Standards.

For the 2018-2019 school year, courses may be taken for credit through Option II only under one of the following scenarios:

  1. The student failed the course and must remediate to recover credit.
  2. The student wishes to fulfill State requirement for visual and performing arts or 21st-century life and careers.

Option II courses cannot be used to fulfill a graduation requirement in English, history, math, science, world language, physical education and health.

All courses must be approved prior to enrolling. Students may not apply for Option II after they have completed a course. Students will be responsible for sending an official transcript confirming the successful completion of the approved course to the Guidance Office. The name of the course, pass/fail grade, and appropriate credits will be recorded on the WHRHS transcript. The grade will not count toward the student’s GPA.

Courses taken prior to the official start of a student's freshman year (September 1) will not appear on the WHRHS transcript under any circumstances.

Progress Reporting

Report Cards: The reporting calendar is divided into four marking periods of nine weeks each. Report cards are available via Parent Access.

Interim Reports: Individual students' progress can be monitored by viewing gradebooks by course in Parent Access.

Promotion Policy

Students are promoted to grade 10 if they have earned 33 credits at the end of grade 9; to grade 11 if they have earned 66 credits at the end of grade 10; and to grade 12 if they have earned 98 credits at the end of grade 11.

Rank in Class

The high school does not report class rank for the college application process. However, once a student has been accepted by a college or university, the school will make class rank available to the college/university for the purposes of financial aid or scholarship eligibility.

Scheduling

Students will begin the scheduling process for school year 2017-2018 in February. In April all students will be sent a listing of courses they have selected. Students will be able to change elective selections at that time. Questions or concerns regarding level changes for rising Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors will need to be addressed with the department supervisor between April 12 and May 15 only. WHRHS will not be offering performance based assessments for level changes in September as we have in the past. Tentative schedules will be sent to students in June. More information can be found on the WHRHS home site under Guidance.

In addition, students who request to drop a course once school has begun must follow the deadlines as described below:

Semester One Courses

  • Dropping a course prior to October 11, 2017 will result in the course not being reported on the transcript.
  • Dropping the course after this date will result in a WP or WF on the transcript.
  • Student schedule remains with 37 credits or more.

Semester Two Courses

  • Dropping a course prior to March 5, 2018 will result in the course not being reported on the transcript.
  • Dropping the course after this date will result in a WP or WF on the transcript.
  • Student schedule remains with 37 credits or more.

Year-Long Courses

  • Dropping a course prior to November 15, 2017 will result in the course not being reported on the transcript.
  • Dropping a course after this date will result in a WP or WF reported on the transcript.
  • Student schedule remains with 37 credits or more.

Special Services

The Watchung Hills Regional High School District endeavors to provide the “least restrictive environment” for all students requiring support services. This department provides a continuum of sequential programs to meet students' individualized learning needs
.

Co-Teaching (or the In-Class Resource Program) occurs in general education classrooms where students require assistance in the areas of organizational skills, study skills, curriculum reinforcement using varied instructional strategies. The co-teaching model provides students with an opportunity to interact with general and special educators who work collaboratively to maximize educational learning experiences in the general education classroom.

A Resource Center Replacement Program provides a replacement curriculum for those students with disabilities requiring a differentiated approach to graduation requirements. The Resource Center program parallels the general education curriculum. Courses are designed to incorporate NJ Core Content Standards with appropriate modifications as well as provide small group instruction, using a multi-modal approach.

A Career Academic Resource Experience (LLD Program) is designed to meet the needs of the learning and language disabled student whose educational goals are appropriately met in a highly structured, individualized program that incorporates career academics, behavioral and social skills, functional life skills, and vocational training. Students fulfill the mandated course requirements in the areas of English, history, math, science, health, and adaptive physical education through the LLD/Special Education curriculum. In addition, students participate in a variety of school-to-work transition experiences through the vocational courses and off-site student internship opportunities. A Transition Coordinator works with the case manager and students' families to plan a program of studies focused on teaching students vocational skills.

Standards for Learning

The New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards (NJCCCS) include Preschool Teaching and Learning Standards as well as K-12 standards for: Visual and Performing Arts; Comprehensive Health and Physical Education; Science; Social Studies; World Languages; Technology; and 21st-Century Life and Careers. Standards for Mathematics and Language Arts Literacy are part of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) initiative coordinated by the Council of Chief States School Officers (CCSSO) and the National Governor's Association (NGA) in partnership with other national organizations. New Jersey is one of 44 states, Washington, DC and the U.S. Virgin Islands to join the state-led Common Core State Standards initiative. Building on the excellent foundation of standards states have laid, the Common Core State Standards are the first step in providing our young people with a high-quality education.

Both the NJCCCS and CCSS address two critical education priorities. The revised standards align with the knowledge and skills needed by all students for post-secondary opportunities, which may encompass: four-year college, community college, technical training, military service, direct entry into the workplace, and an array of future careers - including some that are just being envisioned and others that are currently unforeseen. In addition, the standards by necessity reflect a framework for teaching and learning that responds to the needs of 21st-century digital learners by incorporating the "new literacies" required in an innovation economy: the ability to effectively access, evaluate, and synthesize vast amounts of information; to apply knowledge and skills to personal, workplace, and global challenges; to work collaboratively in cross-cultural settings; to solve problems creatively; and to act ethically as citizens of the world community.

These 21st-century student outcomes require a deeper understanding of academic content at much higher levels than ever before. The revised standards facilitate this in-depth learning in all content areas through the systematic and transparent integration of 21st-century knowledge, skills and themes; global perspectives; cross content connections; and technology. Consequently, successful implementation of the revised standards requires rethinking of traditional curricular and assessment approaches, as well as the creation of 21st-century learning environments in which teachers and students work across and beyond traditional disciplines and boundaries as engaged co-learners, critical and creative thinkers, and problem solvers.

Valedictorian and Salutatorian

Selection of the valedictorian and salutatorian will be based upon the highest and second highest weighted seven-semester GPA respectively. In order to be eligible for consideration, a student must have a history of continuous enrollment at Watchung Hills Regional High School (WHRHS) for at least the fifth, sixth and seventh semesters. Only courses taken at WHRHS from September to June will be included in the GPA calculations.

Graduation Requirements

Successfully complete a minimum of 131 credits. The coursework must include the following course requirements:

four years (20 credits) of English

three years (15 credits) of history: World History, UDS History 1 and 2

three years (15 credits) of math: including Algebra 1 and Geometry

three years (15 credits) of science: including at least 5 credits in laboratory biology/life science, chemistry, environmental science or physics; and an additional laboratory/inquiry-based science

two years (10 credits) of world language

5 credits of visual and performing arts

5 credits of 21st century life and careers or career technical education course(s)

four years (20 credits) of Health and Physical Education

2.5 credits of financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial literacy

5 credits of 21st century life and careers or career technical education Guidance-based

Demonstrate a minimum proficiency required by the State in language arts literacy and mathematics by means of subject specific PARCC assessments, a Substitute Competency Test or meet the criteria of the NJDOE Portfolio Appeal.